In Cantonese, please.

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Posts tagged with "cantonese"

Pretty cool blog entry over at Cantonese Resources, including a key and sound clips for each proverb featured in the picture above. If you’ve got Cantonese parents - wow them with one of these over dinner!
Thanks krysskhros for the submission! :)

Pretty cool blog entry over at Cantonese Resources, including a key and sound clips for each proverb featured in the picture above. If you’ve got Cantonese parents - wow them with one of these over dinner!

Thanks krysskhros for the submission! :)

More cat antics.

We’ve been calling AnGeng “Dusty Chen” whenever she climbs into dusty places in our house. I made up the nickname based on the pronunciation of the words “dust” and “Chen” sound in Cantonese.

dust = 塵 can4
Chen = 陳 can4

Dec 8

Our family recently adopted a stray cat and are domesticating her. We said we wouldn’t name her until she settles and gets used to us, and we can just call her a temporary name instead. Our brother asked what her name was:

A: We’ll call her “An Geng”.

B: Glasses?

A: LOL NO, it’s the Chinese word for stubborn.

硬頸 ngaang6 geng2 = stubborn
眼鏡 ngaan5 geng3*2 = eyeglasses

What did the SHINee members say when they drank too much water?

william-fong:

I need to Onew.

(屙尿 o1 niu6)

manying:

Jin says Learn Chinese :3

Spoiler: Cantonese is better. 

Great examples and love the explanations with the characters on the screen! If you have 8 minutes to spare, this is a fun, interesting watch.

As we’re packing up leftovers from dinner, I was trying to explain to my mother that I preferred meat with no bones in them, as the bones make lunch a tad difficult in the office. 

Difficult to eat is literally 難食 (naan4 sik6) - which happens to be the idiom for “untasty” or “not delicious” and I wasn’t about to say that about her cooking. It also made me wonder if the ease of eating something contributed to the deliciousness of it (think: fall of the bone ribs, oooooomg).

Had to switch it up to 唔方便(m4 fong1 bin6 sik6) - inconvenient to eat.

The phrase 第一手 (dai6 jat1 sau2), literally “the first hand”, can be used to mean the first to use/own/etc. For example, my neighbors had been living in their house for 50+ years, and my father realized: 佢哋係(they are;keoi5 dei6 hai6) 第一手.

The one (一) can be exchanged for other number values to indicate second hand, third hand, and so on.

Started my new year off with dinner and red envelopes last night. Happy Chinese New Year, all!

Started my new year off with dinner and red envelopes last night. Happy Chinese New Year, all!

七七八八 (cat1 cat1 baat3 baat3) - literally “seven seven eight eight” - is an idiom that means “almost done”. So let’s say you’re finishing something up and someone asks if you’re about to leave - you could answer “我七七八八la~.”

Google searches reveal that this idiom may come from meaning 70 to 80 percent done, but there’s nothing really definitive. 

糯米飯 (no6 mai5 faan6), or sticky glutinous rice, that I had at a fancy buffet. They had cute small portions so that you really could try a little of everything. (compared to a coffee creamer)

糯米飯 (no6 mai5 faan6), or sticky glutinous rice, that I had at a fancy buffet. They had cute small portions so that you really could try a little of everything. (compared to a coffee creamer)

Automatic mah jong table - with Cantonese! (hehe)

Some people have expressed that this table isn’t necessary or that amazing, and that stacking is a required skill for mah jong. I’d say I agree - but I was also thinking of my grandparents, aka the master stackers (& anyone else’s elderly family/friends), and saving them a little time & sparing them a little joint pain.

Jan 4

你老母,收皮啦: The fact that Chinese people care a lot about family and filial...

poodleduchess:

The fact that Chinese people care a lot about family and filial obligations reflect even in our cuss words. In Cantonese, there are a few cuss phrases that focus on cussing your entire family out. 冚家鏟 means may your whole family be dead. It can be used as a noun or a verb. You can call a person 冚家鏟 or you can wish them 冚家鏟.

Another one is 仆街, which literally translates to “tripping in the street”. But the phrase actually implies much more. Most native Cantonese speakers are actually unaware of the full implication of the phrase, they just think it means to wish someone to trip and fall. The implication behind this phrase is that you hope someone will die in the street and their dead body won’t be properly buried because they are such a bad person that their family don’t even care for them. Proper burial is important in Chinese culture because it’s related to filial obligations. So telling someone that they are a 仆街 or wishing them to 仆街 is actually more serious than it sounds.

Taro Tapioca Soup! When I was younger, I had this all the time since I had uncles who brought it back from the restaurants they worked at. Delishhh (and really, the only way I like tapioca - so when the bubble tea craze hit, I was like, “Nope.”). Recipe and photo are from Use Real Butter.

Taro Tapioca Soup

3/4 cup tapioca (the tiny tapioca balls)1 lb. taro root (preferably purple, but white works too), peeled and cut into large dice (about 1/2-inch)8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk1/2 cup sugar
In a medium saucepan, bring four cups of water to a boil. Add the taro root and cook until tender – about 20 minutes for fresh taro root. If you use frozen taro root then boil for about 5 or so minutes. Drain the taro root and mash it. Leave some chunks if you like. Boil another 2 cups of water in a saucepan (use same if you like). Add the tapioca to the water and boil for 5-6 minutes. Turn off the heat and cover the pan. Let it sit for 10-15 minutes. The tapioca is done when the pearls are translucent and you can no longer see the white center. Add the coconut milk to the taro root and stir until blended. Stir in the tapioca and sugar over medium heat until the sugar is dissolved. Serve warm. Serves 6.

Taro Tapioca Soup! When I was younger, I had this all the time since I had uncles who brought it back from the restaurants they worked at. Delishhh (and really, the only way I like tapioca - so when the bubble tea craze hit, I was like, “Nope.”). Recipe and photo are from Use Real Butter.

Taro Tapioca Soup

3/4 cup tapioca (the tiny tapioca balls)
1 lb. taro root (preferably purple, but white works too), peeled and cut into large dice (about 1/2-inch)
8 oz. unsweetened coconut milk
1/2 cup sugar

In a medium saucepan, bring four cups of water to a boil. Add the taro root and cook until tender – about 20 minutes for fresh taro root. If you use frozen taro root then boil for about 5 or so minutes. Drain the taro root and mash it. Leave some chunks if you like. Boil another 2 cups of water in a saucepan (use same if you like). Add the tapioca to the water and boil for 5-6 minutes. Turn off the heat and cover the pan. Let it sit for 10-15 minutes. The tapioca is done when the pearls are translucent and you can no longer see the white center. Add the coconut milk to the taro root and stir until blended. Stir in the tapioca and sugar over medium heat until the sugar is dissolved. Serve warm. Serves 6.

bakingexplosion:

纸包蛋糕- cake in paper (it’s a local delicacy of Hong Kong. It’s really sponge cake)
You’ll need these special moulds. Although if you wanted to just make normal sponge cake, this recipe works perfectly!! Very spongey.
Recipe- I only had four moulds, so i only made four of these, remainder i just baked in a little cake mould.
5 eggs50 grams butter60 ml milk100g flour80 grams sugar1/4 teaspoon vanilla extra1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1. Preheat the oven to 180C. Melt butter in a microwave oven or heat over boiling water in a bowl. Separate the egg yolks and the egg whites.2. Add the melted butter into milk, then sift cake flour into it and mix well. Add whisked egg yolks and vanilla extra into the mixture, mix thoroughly.3. Use an electrical mixer to beat egg whites for 3 minutes, then add cream of tartar and blend again. Pour sugar in the egg whites and blend until very stiff peaks form. Fold egg whites into the flour mixture gently with a rubber spatula just until all ingredients are incorporated. Do not stir or beat. For a better result, fold in egg whites with small amount at a time for 3 times.4. Pour batter into cup cake molds that are already lined with baking paper. Bake at 180C for 25 to 30 minutes. Check with a toothpick to see if the cakes are done. If the toothpick comes out of the cake clean, then they’re ready. Allow the cakes to cool for a minute or two in the pan, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Original recipe listed double butter — now the flour’s in there :)
For my fellow non-metric measurement using followers:
5 eggs3.5 tbsp butter*1/4 cup milk1 cup flour2.8 oz sugar (about 0.4 cup)*1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract1/4 teaspoon cream of tartarbaked at 365F
*approximations rounded up slightly.

bakingexplosion:

纸包蛋糕- cake in paper (it’s a local delicacy of Hong Kong. It’s really sponge cake)

You’ll need these special moulds. Although if you wanted to just make normal sponge cake, this recipe works perfectly!! Very spongey.

Recipe- I only had four moulds, so i only made four of these, remainder i just baked in a little cake mould.

5 eggs
50 grams butter
60 ml milk
100g flour
80 grams sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extra
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

1. Preheat the oven to 180C. Melt butter in a microwave oven or heat over boiling water in a bowl. Separate the egg yolks and the egg whites.

2. Add the melted butter into milk, then sift cake flour into it and mix well. Add whisked egg yolks and vanilla extra into the mixture, mix thoroughly.

3. Use an electrical mixer to beat egg whites for 3 minutes, then add cream of tartar and blend again. Pour sugar in the egg whites and blend until very stiff peaks form. Fold egg whites into the flour mixture gently with a rubber spatula just until all ingredients are incorporated. Do not stir or beat. For a better result, fold in egg whites with small amount at a time for 3 times.

4. Pour batter into cup cake molds that are already lined with baking paper. Bake at 180C for 25 to 30 minutes. Check with a toothpick to see if the cakes are done. If the toothpick comes out of the cake clean, then they’re ready. Allow the cakes to cool for a minute or two in the pan, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Original recipe listed double butter — now the flour’s in there :)

For my fellow non-metric measurement using followers:

5 eggs
3.5 tbsp butter*
1/4 cup milk
1 cup flour
2.8 oz sugar (about 0.4 cup)*
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
baked at 365F

*approximations rounded up slightly.

The Ellen Show: Six-Year-Old Piano Prodigy Dazzles